True Colors: Stonewall

We are super pleased to share this new/old colorline with you! When JK Rowling showed her true colors as a TERF (Trans-Exclusionary Radical Feminist), we knew we couldn’t continue to promote or profit off of our color line inspired by her best-known work, but we also loved so many of the colorways we created, so we decided to repackage them into a smaller color line, paying homage to people in the LGBTQIA+ community, with a special emphasis on Trans folk. From 9/16 – 11/25, we’ll be sharing 2 of the colorways from this new True Colors line a week, here on Instagram and on our blog, telling a bit of these stories (you know how we love a good story!). We hope you enjoy honoring this fab group of groundbreaking individuals as much as we have enjoyed learning more about them. We are starting out our journey with two of our favorite colorways from the set, honoring two Trans women who did so much for Trans rights and their communities.

One of our all-time favorite colorways ever, Stonewall is named for the inimitable Marsha P. Johnson, who lived in the US from 1945-1992. Johnson was a Black Trans woman who was one of the inspirations/instigators of the 1969 Stonewall Rebellion along with Sylvia Rivera (look out for a colorway inspired by Sylvia in a few weeks). The P in her name stood for “Pay it No Mind.” Johnson had a glowing personality; everyone loved her. She was a mother figure to many young Trans people, and worked to provide housing for young Trans people in NYC. She founded STAR house in 1970, which was a 4-bedroom apt for Trans folk to live in. Her legacy lives on in many ways, one of which being the Marsha P. Johnson Foundation, which organizes and advocates for Black Trans people. This colorway was originally called Spectrespecs.


We are sharing two projects that feature Stonewall, both from designer Shannon Squire. Margaret Sullivan’s Shawl is in 2 skeins of our Fingering, and Short Attention Span Socks are in our Sock base.

You can find all of our True Colors on our website, including this week’s releases!

True Colors: French Court

We are super pleased to share this new/old colorline with you! When JK Rowling showed her true colors as a TERF (Trans-Exclusionary Radical Feminist), we knew we couldn’t continue to promote or profit off of our color line inspired by her best-known work, but we also loved so many of the colorways we created, so we decided to repackage them into a smaller color line, paying homage to people in the LGBTQIA+ community, with a special emphasis on Trans folk. From 9/16 – 11/25, we’ll be sharing 2 of the colorways from this new True Colors line a week, here on Instagram and on our blog, telling a bit of these stories (you know how we love a good story!). We hope you enjoy honoring this fab group of groundbreaking individuals as much as we have enjoyed learning more about them. We are starting out our journey with two of our favorite colorways from the set, honoring two Trans women who did so much for Trans rights and their communities.

This stunning colorway is French Court, and it honors Chevalière D’Eon, who lived in France from 1728-1810. D’Eon was a White Trans woman who was a secret spy for the French King; she spied on Russia and England, presenting as male the whole time. She transitioned at 49 and was formally presented to the court as a woman – the first trans woman to be presented/accepted at French court. This colorway was originally called Spattergroit

We are sharing two patterns that feature French Court, both from designer Shannon Squire. Bobble-Palooza is a hat in our Worsted base, and Pee Dee Queue socks are in our Sock base.

You can find all of our True Colors on our website, including this week’s releases!

HerStory October 2020: Cristeta Comerford

Our October HerStory recipient, Cristeta Comerford, is a really good cook. So good, in fact, that she became the first woman AND the first person of Asian decent to hold the title of White House Executive Chef in 2005. Although nowadays, she’s probably mostly putting fast food on a plate for our terrible commander-in-chief.

Born in 1962 in Sampaloc, Manila, in the Philippines, Comerford studied food technology at the University of the Philippines, but left to emigrate to the US before finishing college. She worked her way up through the ranks of chefdom, and impressed everyone she worked with with both her strong work ethic and her intuitive cooking style, which she credits to her mother. Comerford has been the White House Executive Chef since 2005, first appointed by Barbara Bush, after serving as a sous chef in the White House for ten years. 

The world of the professional chef is still one that’s dominated by men, even though women are traditionally the ones cooking in their own homes. Comerford realizes what an inspiration her story is to many up-and-coming chefs, and shares her wisdom and knowledge freely. She doesn’t believe she’s reached the pinnacle of what she can achieve, because, as she says, “once you’ve accepted the fact that this is the pinnacle…what is the next step? You go down right? So I think in life, you should never take anything to be the pinnacle. Everything you [achieve should] just be a stepping stone to a better thing.”

Growing up in a large Filipino family, Comerford learned at the knee of a matriarch who effortlessly provided tasty food to her large brood. She learned to navigate small spaces with lots of people, to create foods that appeal to a broad range of palettes, to incorporate seemingly disparate culinary influences into appealing dishes. But she also learned that her family and her interpersonal relationships are what truly feed her, and she both relies on and works to nourish those relationships. On cooking at home, she and her husband are of one mind: if it takes more than 10 minutes, it’s a lot of work. 

Our October colorway, Para su Chef, is one created for this chef, this immigrant who really does get the job done, who has shattered glass ceilings, and keeps on cooking. 

HerStory September 2020: Yalitza Arapacio

Representation matters. No one understands that more than our September HerStory honoree, Yalitza Aparicio. She is a Mexican actress who made her film debut in 2018’s Roma, which centers the Indigenous experience in Mexico. The film tells the story of a live-in housekeeper of Indigenous descent, who code-switches between the family she serves (with whom she speaks Spanish) and her co-worker, who is also Mixtec and with whom she speaks Mixteca. The film was critically acclaimed, not only for the beautiful story it told, but also for shining a light on the plight of the Indigenous community in Mexico. It inspired more focus and attention on Indigenous peoples, and a deeper commitment to activism for Aparicio.

Like much of the world, Mexico is currently experiencing a reckoning in regards to race and class, and particularly in the way Indigenous peoples have been treated. Roma helped to start lots of conversations about the struggles Indigenous people face, and the discrimination against them that is inherent in Mexican society. Colorism is a big problem in Mexico, and it’s long been perpetuated by Mexican media: dark-skinned people with Indigenous features are often relegated to the lower rungs of a society that is deeply classist, and are not represented in much of popular culture.

When people don’t have access to things like the cinema, they don’t pursue careers in things like the cinema, and therefore are not represented in things like the cinema. Aparicio works with organizations that aim to expand access to movie theaters, therefore exposing Indigenous folk to the possibilities, not only inherent in the stories that are told, but in the telling of the stories. Aparicio’s parents are both Indigenous; her father is Mixtec and her mother is Trique. Her casting in Roma was very deliberate: director Alfonso Cuarón wanted an recognizably Indigenous woman to play this role. This in itself was a revolutionary act, as lighter skin is held to a higher regard throughout Mexico.

Our Indigenous Excellence colorway celebrates the indigenous heritage of Yalitza Aparicio; each skein is a blending of the traditional regalia. We hope you’ll take some time to learn more about the indigenous people of your home country as you work with your September HerStory yarn, and maybe rent Roma while you’re at it.